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Suppose, I somehow happen to dig a hole diametrically through the Earth (neglecting all constraints like molten core etc ) ... and I throw an object from one side of the hole, will it reach the other end?

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  • $\begingroup$ Yeah sure, if you ignore air friction and the rotation of the Earth and assume the Earth is a perfect sphere then you can drop it and it will fall all the way to the surface of the other side, and oscillate back and forth. $\endgroup$ – Brandon Enright Feb 3 '14 at 18:10
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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicates: physics.stackexchange.com/q/7346/2451 and links therein. Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/2481/2451 and links therein. $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Feb 3 '14 at 18:11
  • $\begingroup$ Mass is responsible for gravity , why would it pass the centre if there is where the max mass exist ? $\endgroup$ – user125892 Feb 3 '14 at 18:24
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    $\begingroup$ No one says the mass is st the center; they say that mathematically, you can treat the spherically distributed mass as if it were at the center, and get the correct result... $\endgroup$ – DJohnM Feb 3 '14 at 20:23
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Drill through the spin axis, or the vacuum free fall trajectory scrapes the side from Coriolis force. Other than that,

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/mechanics/earthole.html

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