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Suppose the sun would turn into a black hole. Now neglecting the effect on the living beings on the earth. would the sun suck up the earth or the earth's revolution would not be affected?

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marked as duplicate by John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, Brandon Enright, Emilio Pisanty, Qmechanic Jan 24 '14 at 18:55

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"Turn into a black hole" indicates a need to do some serious reading about what a black hole is. It should be obvious, for example, that merely collapsing the sun's total mass&energy into a smaller volume will not change the strength of the gravitational field at Earth's orbit.

It might be more interesting if the putative black hole's polar radiation flumes were aimed at Earth :-)

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Assuming the sun's gravitational field remained constant at Earth's distance from it (1 AU), and that we were not subject to the Black Hole's polar radiation.

The earth would no longer be subject to the solar winds which exert several (3) forces on the magnetosphere in a quite complex relationship. See: Here

The effect would be to, albeit slowly reduce the earth's distance from the sun as the effect of angular momentum against the sun's gravity would no longer be affected by the continual force of the solar wind and the stability of its orbit would be thrown into chaos by the same effect occuring to all other planetary and smaller bodies such as comets and the asteroid belt: Here article 2198 THe Oort cloud may be too far out to considder in the short term. But to simply say the Earth would start to drift inwards would be to neglect the effect on the whole solar system, which would be chaotic, and difficult to predict, as precise measurements of the changing relative position and mutual influence would require such precision as to be harshly taxing even on the world's greatest supercomputers.

We'd all die fairly rapidly because of a global ice age and finite food reserves, unless someone wants to start a geothermal (relying on the Earth's heat output) community sufficiently well equipped. But even then we'd be uncertain about large-body collisions with the Earth rendering the crust too unstable to allow survival.

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