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Einsteins' time paradox was shown when two atomic clocks were synchronized and one was sent in a super sonic plane and the other kept at rest. When the two where then checked it was shown that yes indeed the clock that took the plain trip had lost time when compared to the clock that was kept at rest.

My question is what if instead of one of the clocks going on a plain it was put into a centrifuge or some other device that spun it around and very high speeds would it feel the effects of time dilation in the same manner?

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    $\begingroup$ Short answer: yes! $\endgroup$ – gj255 Jan 11 '14 at 10:28
  • $\begingroup$ As velocity increases or as gravity decreases time dialation occurs. Is your centerfuge at sea level or in Denver? $\endgroup$ – user58353 Sep 2 '14 at 0:05
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    $\begingroup$ @Aloewishs: Acceleration is what matters, not velocity. Clocks will run slower in a helicopter at 3km than in a supersonic jet at 30km, and slower yet than in a balloon at 60km altitude. $\endgroup$ – Mike Dunlavey Sep 2 '14 at 0:27
  • $\begingroup$ @MikeDunlavey Indeed, the deeper question is how the split between dilation due to velocity and acceleration breaks down. $\endgroup$ – Alan Rominger Sep 2 '14 at 0:45
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    $\begingroup$ @AlanSE: The time dilation due to velocity alone is relative - each one sees the other as slower (special relativity). The time dilation due to acceleration is absolute - they both agree which one is slower (general relativity). That's how the twin paradox is resolved. $\endgroup$ – Mike Dunlavey Sep 2 '14 at 1:15
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Yes it would because it is still travelling at Super Sonic speeds regardless of whether it is sent off to some distant planet or moon.

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Yes, because what slows down clocks is acceleration, whether by gravity or by centrifuge, if you like.

It doesn't matter how fast the airplane is, but how high it is, because gravity is stronger at lower elevations.

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  • $\begingroup$ How do you mean that the speed doesn't matter? According to the Hafele-Keating experiment there is both a gravity and a velocity part in the total time dilation. Or am I misunderstanding something? $\endgroup$ – Markus Oct 30 '14 at 12:16

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