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If water is cycled through a thin pipe by a pump, and a certain spot on that pump is made of thin copper that is being heated by a 1000 C source, will the water, as a whole, attain a heat of 1000 C (or close to it) and keep cycling, making the entire pipe incredibly hot? Oh, and this would be a closed loop cycle.

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  • $\begingroup$ What you're describing is called convection. $\endgroup$ Jan 2, 2014 at 22:56
  • $\begingroup$ At a constant pressure the water would boil, that cools the liquid water, limiting its temperature. $\endgroup$ Jan 2, 2014 at 23:25
  • $\begingroup$ Considering that the water will be boiling and the copper will be fairly close to its melting point, I suspect the water wouldn't stay inside the pipe for very long. $\endgroup$
    – N. Virgo
    Jan 3, 2014 at 1:40

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Provided its a general situation, the heat will circulate through the pipe (and the water of course) but most of it will be radiated out. At no point will a measurable amount of water reach a $1000 ^\circ C $. Even if some of the water reaches that temperature or close to it, it will lose it to the colder surroundings. In the end at some point this heat leak out to the surroundings. Assuming that somehow there is no heat loss, eventually the whole pipe will approach $1000^\circ C$ as there is an inflow of energy but no place for it to escape to.

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