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Could a device with very thin columns of glass or something that attracts water more be used to pull water up and then release it to drive generator and perhaps add vacuum.

I have been wondering about this on and off for like 8 years.

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No, this sadly will not work. You can of course get water up this way, but it won't disconnect from the glass tube. As capillary forces result from surface tension, to make the water fall back down, you will need to overcome this surface tension. This turns out to cancel the "won" energy.

With a colleague I already discussed a more sophisticated way to try to employ this phenomenon using super fluids. Due to surface tension they tend to flow up walls. So if you put a super fluid in an container a thin film will flow up to the ceiling of the container. But yet again, it won't just fall down.

So no, you cannot farm energy this way.

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  • $\begingroup$ would you consider it to be a significant step if even little drops start dripping instead of continuous stream. $\endgroup$ – Muhammad Umer Dec 19 '13 at 2:36
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    $\begingroup$ capillary action is due to inter molecular force right..so if there are molecules that rearrange themselves as such that their inter molecular forces cancel out and lose the capillary action force and if we make the last part of upside u bent tube as that than applying little bit of electricity to open and close the attraction would basically allow to create a pump like thing or so. $\endgroup$ – Muhammad Umer Dec 19 '13 at 2:42
  • $\begingroup$ I know it's old, but I actually saw video where the same thing was demonstrated and it was working, however, person demonstrating said it was not creating energy only looks like it. $\endgroup$ – Muhammad Umer Jun 17 '17 at 3:33

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