1
$\begingroup$

This question already has an answer here:

I work at a warehouse where we re-pack plastic sheets. Every single day I get shocked when I touch the aluminum foil and even the plastic sheets. What are some useful tips to prevent this from happening?

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by Brandon Enright, tpg2114, Emilio Pisanty, Abhimanyu Pallavi Sudhir, Qmechanic Nov 13 '13 at 18:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

0
$\begingroup$

This depends on the storage and handling requirements of the various products in the warehouse, but one way to reduce the accumulation of static charge is to increase the humidity. Dry air is a pretty good insulator, so charges built up by handling materials will tend to remain in place. Humidity won't make the air conductive (at least, not in the normal sense of conductivity), but will provide an opportunity for accumulated charges to dissipate. Humidity likely won't be the whole solution, but it should make your workplace a little less shocking.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Wat are some more tips. Moist hands, rubbing metal? Wood? $\endgroup$ – user33703 Nov 13 '13 at 16:13
0
$\begingroup$

This pretty much sums up winter here in Canada!

You could wear gloves. Anyway, a lab instructor of mine has people touch one end of a small resistor while he holds the other (and ground) after they have a go at the Van de Graaff generator. The static discharge still occurs, but much less slowly.

Btw this problem is of great concern in certain industries (electronics, chemical) and you could ask your employer to look into shoe grounding assemblies. Being shocked constantly is an occupational hazard there are regulations covering this sort of thing.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.