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I noticed that deodorant (or anti-transpirant) spray bottles (pressurized?) usually contain $150~\text{ml}$, max $200~\text{ml}$ (that I've seen; although I think I spotted some $300~\text{ml}$ on the Chinese internet).

Is there a physics reason for this (not being larger)?

enter image description here

(For example, and just guessing wildly, could it be that larger bottles are dangerous at certain mountainous heights?? Or larger bottles have a "spraying pressure" that is not constant enough??)

PS: Note the quantum bit in the product name. :)

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  • $\begingroup$ Probably not. I mean, in all likelihood they could make them bigger, but figured it'd be more business-efficient to market them in the size they are, similar to how Coca-Cola doesn't sell their sodas in 5-gallon cans; it's not because they couldn't do it, it's because no one would buy them. $\endgroup$ – DumpsterDoofus Oct 24 '13 at 22:23
  • $\begingroup$ It's mostly marketing. Very small cans and very large cans have been made, but they aren't as popular. The small cans aren't cost effective because you're paying for a smaller contents to can ratio, and the large cans are too difficult for people to hold and use. The current can size is the result of much experimenting by a horde of marketing departments. If people's preferences change in the future then no doubt the can sizes will too. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Oct 25 '13 at 16:30
  • $\begingroup$ @JohnRennie OK, so nothing physicsy like weaker structure/dangerous expansion/etc. Sure about that? PS: A couple of weeks ago I saw a $1~\text{l}$ beer can. :) Shotgun, anyone? $\endgroup$ – Řídící Oct 25 '13 at 16:52
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    $\begingroup$ @aufkag: the pressure in aerosol cans is only 3-5 atmosphere's so they don't make that big a bang if they burst (I'm assuming you're not putting it in a fire to burst it :-). Where I worked we had a machine that punctured anti-perspirant cans so they could be disposed of safely, and while the cloud of released AP was quite spectacular the can itself didn't do anything impressive. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Oct 25 '13 at 17:02
  • $\begingroup$ @JohnRennie I will not ask where you worked, but you lot must have been working very hard. $\endgroup$ – Řídící Oct 25 '13 at 17:20
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It's mostly marketing. Very small cans and very large cans have been made, but they aren't as popular. The small cans aren't cost effective because you're paying for a smaller contents to can ratio, and the large cans are too difficult for people to hold and use. The current can size is the result of much experimenting by a horde of marketing departments. If people's preferences change in the future then no doubt the can sizes will too. – John Rennie

@aufkag: the pressure in aerosol cans is only 3-5 atmosphere's so they don't make that big a bang if they burst (I'm assuming you're not putting it in a fire to burst it :-). Where I worked we had a machine that punctured anti-perspirant cans so they could be disposed of safely, and while the cloud of released AP was quite spectacular the can itself didn't do anything impressive. – John Rennie

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