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To understand hysemberg uncertainty principle first I want to understand the uncertainty in position term . In hysemberg thought experiment he told that the uncertainty in position is due to the diffraction of light by the particle we are observing . We consider a electromagnetic pulse moving towards the uniformly moving point charge . The pulse has non zero components only in a certain range . The range is approaching the particle and finally the particle finds itself in oscillating EM fields . The particle will accelerate due to EM force . In this way it will generate it's own EM pulse until it is again out of that very EM pulse which came to it. The position and momentum of the particle will be changed . My question is that will an observer not know the particle's initial position (point where the pulse touched the particle ) with certainty or what will an eye see when it receives the pulse?

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When a single photon encounters a single electron, the energy level will be elevated. When the electron's energy level lowers it will emit new photons in random directions. To perceive this phenomenon, it would require thousands if not millions of photons bombarding the electron, just to have enough photons randomly emitted back toward your eye. However, by the time enough photons are gathered from observation, the electron has already progressed, emitting more new photons along its path. Therefore, the likelihood of observing the initial event is slim to none. So in a typical slit experiment when you're trying to detect which slit an electron is traversing, you would not illuminate the traveling electron, but instead what you would notice is the electron impact location on the detection screen has been altered. After many attempts to detect which path you will notice that the interference pattern that was on the screen has been altered or completely gone.

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