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According to general relativity, time dilation occurs due to strong gravitational fields and high relative velocities, causing time to pass more slowly compared to observers in weaker gravitational fields or lower velocities.

However, my question is kind of the opposite - is there a specific location or region in the observable universe where the rate of time dilation is minimized, meaning time passes at the fastest rate compared to any other point?

In other words, is there a point or area of the universe that could be considered a "time dilation minimum" where the effects of gravitational fields and relative velocities are the weakest, allowing for the most rapid passage of time from that reference frame relative to any other point?

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    $\begingroup$ Hm, looks like you are asking for the center of the universe. Good luck! $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 11 at 3:27
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    $\begingroup$ @AmirhosseinRezaei,. Ups, I have mistaken your question. It should be some location in a void. Interestingly, in all points of the void the time dilatation would be the same. $\endgroup$
    – JanG
    Commented Apr 11 at 15:47
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, it's called the Axis of Evil! $\endgroup$
    – Fattie
    Commented May 18 at 15:02
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    $\begingroup$ For anyone who's wondering: en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/…. $\endgroup$ Commented May 18 at 15:47
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    $\begingroup$ I'd recommend you also right an answer. @Fattie $\endgroup$ Commented May 18 at 15:48

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The universe is, to the best of our current knowledge, both isotropic and homogenous at large scales. So there will be no one point that is singled out at cosmological scales. All that would matter is the nearby distribution of matter, with “nearby” being defined at cosmological scales. So you just want a region in the middle of a large void.

Velocities are relative. So “at rest” is the least time dilation, however you define “at rest”.

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    $\begingroup$ @AmirhosseinRezaei thanks for the upvote. That put me over 100k! $\endgroup$
    – Dale
    Commented Apr 12 at 1:23
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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps then "The Bootes Void" is a good answer $\endgroup$
    – Fattie
    Commented May 18 at 15:03
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This question actually has more of a "physiological" answer than of a "scientific" answer. The notion of dime dilation is frame-dependent. Let's say you are a moving observer. You can consider yourself at rest, and the entire universe is moving with respect to you. So, you conclude that because you are at rest, you experience the least time dilation. The same goes for any other observer. Only you could know that you have experienced more time dilation is when you stop, thus your absurd change of reference will cause more time to be passed in your frame. So, if there is a body that is always in motion in the universe (that most of the bodies actually do, for instance the voyagers, they will be in motion for many billion years), the notion that who experiences least time dilation becomes relative.

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