1
$\begingroup$

I wanted to know if it is possible to perform a double slit experiment with electrons travelling at 0.99c as the wavelength is very short.

$\endgroup$

1 Answer 1

2
$\begingroup$

Do you mean in principle or in practice? In principle the answer is "yes, even fast electrons can in principle be brought into a state with a superposition of directions of motion which would lead to interference fringes." In practice the answer is "the short wavelength makes it very difficult." At $0.99c$ for electrons I find the wavelength is around $10^{-42}\,$m. This is a lot smaller than the Planck length so it is very hard to suggest how to form a structure to act as 'slits' or, more generally, how to form a pair of collimated beams at a slight angle or how to detect the interference.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ So what is the smallest wavelength we could work with in practice and what would be the energies would be like?Does special relativity come into the play? $\endgroup$
    – Pshyco
    Feb 21 at 11:18
  • $\begingroup$ If you don't mind could you show me how to do the calculations $\endgroup$
    – Pshyco
    Feb 21 at 11:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.