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I saw the features of the Sun here and it has almost everything include nanojets and CME but not relativistic jets. Isn't the Sun magnetically active so why isn't it capable of shooting out relativistic jets?

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    $\begingroup$ Do you have a better link to that source? Right now, you question isn't really understandable without the link, but it's a deep link to an image one someone else's server. That's a recipe for a question which won't make sense to anyone in a year. $\endgroup$
    – rob
    Feb 8 at 4:02
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    $\begingroup$ I, for one, have no desire for our sun to be shooting relativistic jets anywhere near me... $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Feb 8 at 13:30

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Actually, the Sun is able to eject relativistic particles (https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/202243903, open access):

The Sun accelerates electrons, protons, and ions to suprathermal energies in a variety of transient events, ranging from small flares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The processes governing the acceleration and propagation are relevant for astrophysical plasmas in general. In the solar case, the available diagnostics of non-thermal particles are particularly rich, including their electromagnetic emissions and measurements in space. In exceptional cases, particles are accelerated up to mildly relativistic energies, namely, GeV to tens of GeV for nucleons, and MeV for electrons.

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    $\begingroup$ These are not relativistic jets and therefore this doesn't address the question. $\endgroup$
    – ProfRob
    Feb 8 at 8:51

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