-3
$\begingroup$

Heat is defined as any spontaneous flow of energy from one object to another, caused by a difference in temperature between the objects. We say that “heat” flows from a warm radiator into a cold room, from hot water into a cold ice cube, and from the hot sun to the cool earth. The mechanism may be different in each case, but in each of these processes the energy transferred is called “heat.” - Schroeder, Page 18, An introduction to Thermal Physics

Here there are two definitions of heat are given, first is the flow of energy due to temperature difference, and the other is the amount of energy transferred due to temperature difference.

Which one is correct?

$\endgroup$
12
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ That's the same... $\endgroup$ Feb 4 at 23:52
  • $\begingroup$ @naturallyInconsistent not necessarily, flow is ambiguous here, is it energy flux? Is it dE/dt? $\endgroup$ Feb 4 at 23:53
  • $\begingroup$ The word flow there is the same as transferred. "The amount of energy that had flowed due to temperature difference." $\endgroup$ Feb 4 at 23:57
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Ghoster heat is to thermal energy as work is to mechanical energy. All four concepts are important and distinct. $\endgroup$
    – Dale
    Feb 5 at 1:18
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Dale OK, thanks. Thermodynamics was never one of my strong points. $\endgroup$
    – Ghoster
    Feb 5 at 1:28

1 Answer 1

2
$\begingroup$

Here there are two definitions of heat are given, first is the flow of energy due to temperature difference, and the other is the amount of energy transferred due to temperature difference.

There is no difference between the two.

The first describes the mechanism for transferring energy between substances of different temperature, the other describes the amount of energy transferred due to the temperature difference. Either way, the definition differentiates heat from the other form of energy transfer in thermodynamics, namely work, where work is the transfer of energy due to force times displacement.

Hope this helps.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.