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After inelastic collision do particles stick together or they move together as a result of common velocity since in elasticity is related to coefficient of restitution and coefficient of restitution is related to velocities not the intrinsic properties and shall we treat them two different particles while calculating or a single particle

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  • $\begingroup$ What goes on during a collision is complicated. Most collision problems in first physics classes do not consider it. They just ask about the state before and after. That is what conservation laws are for. You don't have to know the details during a collision to know the momentum after is the same as before. $\endgroup$
    – mmesser314
    Commented Dec 25, 2023 at 14:41

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After inelastic collision do particles stick together or they move together as a result of common velocity...

Objects stick together and move with the same velocity only in the case of a completely (maximally) inelastic collision. A completely inelastic collision is one where the maximum amount of kinetic energy is lost consistent with the need for momentum to always be conserved.

...since in elasticity is related to coefficient of restitution and coefficient of restitution is related to velocities not the intrinsic properties...

The coefficient of restitution is related to the intrinsic properties of the material. The lower the coefficient of restitution, the more inelastic the properties of the material. The elasticity of the material can be thought of as the ability of a deformed material to return to its original shape and size when the forces causing the deformation are removed.

...and shall we treat them two different particles while calculating or a single particle

If the particles move together as one with the same velocity, you treat them as one particle after the collision having mass equal to the sum of the two masses before the collision, and momentum equal to the sum of the momenta of the original particles prior to the collision.

Hope this helps.

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