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I know that the direction of friction has been discussed extensively here. However, I am still wondering about a particular issue (applies for slipping and no slipping). Consider this book: https://openstax.org/books/university-physics-volume-1/pages/11-1-rolling-motion

From my understanding, the component of weight of the wheel acting parallel to the surface is accelerating the wheel down (it is unbalanced). A frictional force opposes the direction of the motion, creating a torque, which results in an angular acceleration.

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My question is: if the point of contact between the wheel and the surface is zero, shouldn't the free-body diagram show another friction in the direction of motion or how can I imagine the velocity at the point of contact to become zero?

This also applies to rolling with slipping: should there not be a part of friction opposing the tangential velocity at the point of contact (even though it is insufficient to prevent slipping)?

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When rolling the acceleration of the wheel is less than if it was slipping and just undergoing translational motion.

The frictional force does two things to keep the no slip condition satisfied.
It reduces the translational acceleration of the centre of mass whilst at the same time providing a torque about the centre of mass which provides an angular acceleration of the wheel.

To show that you understand what I have written can you convince yourself that when the wheel is rolling without slipping up the slope the frictional force is still in an upward direction?

$\dots$ how can I imagine the velocity at the point of contact to become zero?
Look at the addition of the velocity vectors due to translation and rotation in the answer to Confusion about rolling motion

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