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Why does a changing magnetic flux induce an electric field? When a coil moves through a magnetic field, the induced emf is due to the Lorentz force. But why does a changing magnetic flux produce an induced electric field and emf even though the coil is stationary or there is no coil?

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It is an experimental fact, As already discussed in scientific community, It is very difficult to Answer a "why" question, because answers to these "why" questions are always given so that the understanding shifts from one frame to another, that is you understand other facts with help of accepted and satisfactory basic fact/axiom/theory, In this case, for learning it first time, just accept That Electric field Is produced whenever Magnetic flux is changed, and then Understand Other things in Electrodynamics using these

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It is mostly about moving charges, i.e. electrons. These have their own electric field as well as a magnetic field and interact with external electric respectively magnetic fields.

An external magnetic field causes an alignment of the dipole direction of the magnetic field of the electron. If the external magnetic field varies, photons are emitted from the electron and the electron is deflected. At the same time, the magnetic alignment is disturbed. By changing the external magnetic field, this process is repeated.

To prove this phenomenon, it is sufficient to observe whether the power loss for changing the magnetic field increases when electrons are in this field and whether EM radiation is produced by the electrons in the process.

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