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If we place different materials in the microwave owen, they will get hot at different speeds. For instance meals get hot really fast. What material property decides on the strength of the coupling? Resistance? Permeability?

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  • $\begingroup$ Food in a microwave is not normally considered an "antenna", so you might get a better response if the title matched the actual content of the question. $\endgroup$ Sep 17, 2023 at 1:41
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, the title actually reflects of what I would like to know. $\endgroup$
    – Mariusz
    Sep 18, 2023 at 11:37

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Many factors influence microwave heating. Resistance, dielectric absorption, magnetic hysteresis, geometry, ...

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In AC regime, major part of non-magnetic material medium's response to external EM field (the linear part) can be described either via the frequency-dependent complex conductivity $\sigma(\omega)$, or via frequency-dependent complex permittivity $\epsilon(\omega)$. The choice is somewhat arbitrary and depends on convention, and the two functions differ by a trivial frequency factor. In optics permittivity/index of refraction is used, in conductive materials (metals) conductivity is used.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for your comment. I'm actually comparing 3 wires: metal (Molybdenum), carbon fibre (so mainly graphite) and silicon carbide (SiC). And I'm trying to figure out which one will absorb more energy in frequency range 50 MHz - 1 GHz. Where do I find data about frequency-dependent complex permittivity? $\endgroup$
    – Mariusz
    Sep 18, 2023 at 11:42

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