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I have been reading about the hypothetical possibility of "strange matter consuming the Earth" and there is one thing I don't understand. I understand that it has been shown that it is essentially impossible to create a strangelet (i.e. an atomic nucleus that also has a bunch of strange quarks) in a particle accelerator. But I do know that there are particles that do have multiple strange quarks (e.g. the $\Omega$ baryon or $\Xi-\Xi$ dibaryon) that can be produced in collisions. If one of those particles were absorbed by an ordinary nucleus, such as one in a detector or the wall of the beampipe, would it be possible for that to turn the nucleus into a strangelet? I know there are things called "hypernuclei" which are also like nuclei that have strange quarks in them, and from what I can tell hypernuclei are known to decay rather than grow, but I'm not sure exactly what the difference is.

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Strange matter is very different from a nucleus containing a baryon with strange quarks.

As you say, nuclei with strange baryons have been observed but they are all unstable because the strange baryon rapidly decays typically through weak interactions. For example the lambda baryon has been observed in a lithium nucleus but the hypernuclei are not stable and the lambda decays to some combination of a proton, neutron and pions in about $10^{-10}$ seconds. So it is not possible to create strange matter from a strange baryon.

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