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I have a idea I'd like to explore: If a black hole can bend light due to its immense gravitational attraction, could we imagine an 'inverted black hole'? In this hypothetical scenario, this object would behave similarly to a black hole but with a force of repulsion instead of attraction. This repulsion would cause light to curve away from it, making it impossible for light to reach the white hole.

I'm also curious about whether there are software or codes available that could help me visualize this concept, similar to how software like 'Space Engine' visualizes regular black holes.

Right now, to keep things simple, I wish only to explore how this hypotetical object would affect light and images.

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    $\begingroup$ What you are describing is a White hole $\endgroup$
    – Triatticus
    Aug 26, 2023 at 19:20
  • $\begingroup$ Actually I should clarify it's not exactly a white whole but the idea is similar. But obviously there are some differences since white holes are still attractive gravitationally, one just cannot move into the horizon of a white hole. $\endgroup$
    – Triatticus
    Aug 26, 2023 at 20:40
  • $\begingroup$ Couldn’t you take the geodesic equations for a Schwarzschild black hole and change $M$ to $-M$? $\endgroup$
    – Ghoster
    Aug 26, 2023 at 23:45
  • $\begingroup$ The object you are describing is not part of mainstream physics, as far as I know, which makes the question off-topic for this site. $\endgroup$
    – Ghoster
    Aug 26, 2023 at 23:48
  • $\begingroup$ It is not a white hole at all and this question is not off topic. General Relativity with exotic matter (like negative mass) is a mainstream area of research. $\endgroup$
    – safesphere
    Aug 27, 2023 at 20:41

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The closest mainstream object to your description is a naked Reissner-Nordström singularity. Only radially inward pointing null geodesics can reach this, everything else is reflected/repelled by it.

You can visualise this effect with Space Engine (general relativity update), if you set the Q/M ratio of a black hole greater to 1, and angular momentum to 0.

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