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What exactly would happen if we sent a frequency that was not one of the harmonics into a closed and open pipe? What would happen if we gradually increased this frequency?

From my understanding, I think if we were to send down this frequency, a standing wave could not form, so when we gradually increase this frequency, as soon as it matches the harmonic a standing wave is produced and max amplitude creates a loud sound. Would this be correct?

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  • $\begingroup$ Probably the sound would not be louder, but your loudspeaker may be destroyed, I did so with experiments on the Kundt's tube. $\endgroup$
    – trula
    Aug 13, 2023 at 11:00

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If we were to send down this frequency, a standing wave could not form, so when we gradually increase this frequency, as soon as it matches the harmonic a standing wave is produced and max amplitude creates a loud sound

Yes, that is correct. An input frequency that does not match one of the pipe's harmonics is not amplified by the pipe, whereas an input frequency that does match a harmonic is amplified. In practice the input into a flue pipe in an organ, for example, is noise - a mixture of frequencies caused by air flowing turbulently over the lip or labium of the pipe - but only the frequencies that match one of the pipe's harmonics are amplified by the pipe.

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