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Whenever there is contact between objects, there exists a normal force. If we apply force on an object, our hands are in contact with the block, so there will be a normal force on my hand and normal force on the block, so the net force acting on the block will be the applied force plus the normal force.

Why don't we include the normal force acting between our hand and object?

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  • $\begingroup$ Please clarify your specific problem or provide additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it's hard to tell exactly what you're asking. $\endgroup$
    – JGBM
    Aug 12, 2023 at 15:08
  • $\begingroup$ whenever we apply a force on an object then why dont we include the normal force acting between our hand and object $\endgroup$
    – user374813
    Aug 12, 2023 at 15:18
  • $\begingroup$ I am going to actually add your question to the post. The answer is that what you are calling the normal force and the applied force are the same thing. $\endgroup$
    – JGBM
    Aug 12, 2023 at 15:31

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The normal force is the applied force.

The formal definition of the normal force is (using Khan's academy definition): "The normal force is the force that surfaces exert to prevent solid objects from passing through each other"

If you are pushing an object, the origin of the force you are exerting on the object actually that one. Microscopically, it comes from the electromagnetic interactions between the constituents of matter.

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  • $\begingroup$ what if i apply force to an angle still the normal will act $\endgroup$
    – user374813
    Aug 12, 2023 at 15:40
  • $\begingroup$ Technically, it would be a mixture of the normal force and friction. But these are formalizations. Microscopically, both things are mediated by the same mechanisms. $\endgroup$
    – JGBM
    Aug 12, 2023 at 15:50

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