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In order to program it, where can I find accurate representations of the water (or others - e.g.: CO2) phase diagrams, in the form of mathematical functions or in the form of interpolable tabulated data? (I'm not in this domain - just a hobbyist, and I have no specific institutional access)

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  • $\begingroup$ Note to mods: Add CW post notice when bounty is gone. $\endgroup$
    – Qmechanic
    Jun 6, 2023 at 12:39
  • $\begingroup$ Why did you change my question to Community Wiki ? $\endgroup$
    – Camion
    Jun 11, 2023 at 10:55
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    $\begingroup$ That is standard policy for res. recom. qs, cf. e.g. this meta post. $\endgroup$
    – Qmechanic
    Jun 11, 2023 at 10:59

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For water, the canonical source is

Wagner, W., & Pruß, A. (2002). The IAPWS formulation 1995 for the thermodynamic properties of ordinary water substance for general and scientific use. Journal of physical and chemical reference data, 31(2), 387-535. www.thermophysics.ru/pdf_doc/IAPWS_1995.pdf

For CO2, see, e.g.,

Wang, J., Jia, C. S., Li, C. J., Peng, X. L., Zhang, L. H., & Liu, J. Y. (2019). Thermodynamic properties for carbon dioxide. ACS omega, 4(21), 19193-19198.

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Perry's Chemical Engineering Handbook is full of tables and empirical equations for estimating physical properties of a variety of substances.

On line you can find reliable data in data banks such as:

Dortmund Data Bank: http://dortmunddatabank.com/

Korean Data Bank: https://cheric.org/research/kdb/

NIST Chemical Web Book: https://webbook.nist.gov/chemistry/

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