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They're uncomfortable, but they still correct vision. I think there is probably a simple physics explanation for this, but I haven't been able to find one by thinking/googling around.

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    $\begingroup$ what do you mean by "inside out" in this context? $\endgroup$
    – hyportnex
    Commented May 21, 2023 at 13:24
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    $\begingroup$ Does the explanation of meniscus lenses on wikipedia help <en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lens#Types_of_simple_lenses>? $\endgroup$ Commented May 21, 2023 at 13:28
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    $\begingroup$ He means that the inside of the lens faces outwards. "Inside" means the side that goes "in" towards the eye normally; "outside" is the outward oriented world. $\endgroup$
    – AnoE
    Commented May 22, 2023 at 10:28
  • $\begingroup$ @AnoE thank you, yes this is what I mean. $\endgroup$ Commented May 23, 2023 at 12:52

1 Answer 1

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The key mechanical property that enables the optical function of the lens is that its thickness varies from the center to the edge. That doesn't change.

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  • $\begingroup$ A meniscus lens with constant nonzero thickness still has nonzero optical power. $\endgroup$
    – TLW
    Commented May 22, 2023 at 1:21
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    $\begingroup$ @TLW Constant thickness also doesn't change when you flip the lens inside out. $\endgroup$ Commented May 22, 2023 at 7:11
  • $\begingroup$ Correct, however that is besides the point. Non-constant thickness is not "[t]he key mechanical property that enables the optical function of the lens". $\endgroup$
    – TLW
    Commented Aug 6, 2023 at 23:06

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