1
$\begingroup$

I'm starting to become curious about AdS/CFT since hearing that condensed matter theorists use it as a 'dictionary' to find gravity duals of things from condensed matter physics. How exactly does this dictionary work? Also, are there other promising theories that link gravity in bulk to a conformal field theory at the boundary, just like AdS/CFT? And could the same dictironary be used there?

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ AdS/CFT is a framework that connects a class of gravitational theories (that are all asymptotically AdS) to a class of quantum field theories in one lower dimension. $\endgroup$
    – Prahar
    Apr 10, 2023 at 18:38

1 Answer 1

0
$\begingroup$

Not just condensed matter people, but also the folks doing high energy physics. And as of your question of linking a theory of quantum gravity to a CFT (not on "the" boundary in the conventional sense since the boundary for AdS/CFT was very convenient for a lot of reasons, mainly that in the sense of holographic entanglement entropy you can make a bulk-boundary duality from a minimal spacelike surface joining the boundary points), this is simply what holography is, relating a bulk quantum gravity theory in $D$ dimensions to a boundary CFT on a $D-1$ boundary. For de Sitter, this is $\mathcal{I}^{\pm }$ (although the CFT lives on only one large $S^{D}$) naturally. However, this has several complications, like complex-valued entanglement entropy due to a non-unitary CFT, density matrices being transition matrices, no proper "nice" idea of subregion duality, etc. But there is static patch holography, where the pode-antipode system is related to stretched horizon degrees of freedom in the static patch picture. And so on. The point is, there are other examples of dualities, but they are not quite as convenient as AdS/CFT. The bottom-line therefore, is, there are, but at the cost of simplicity. This is an exciting prospect, but it is much messier than AdS/CFT.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.