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I have done a bunch of search for information about: which particles with how much energy exist in near space environment of earth in inner and outer Van Allen Belt or satellite orbits like GEO MEO and LEO, and I found some sporadic and sometimes antithetic information. Any help Would be awarding.

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  • $\begingroup$ This information is standardized by space agencies as nominal models of particle type and energy distributions. Real-time data depends pretty much on solar weather. $\endgroup$ Aug 31, 2013 at 20:34

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To understand what particles are in what zones you have to understand the magnetic fields around the planet. Since they move dramatically and we don't really have anything like a real time map, you might be approaching your question the wrong way. Particles don't get funneled into specific orbits, they bounce, interact, bend their way around the planet. Some of them are caught and work their way towards the north pole, but it moves around all time. Without knowing the reason for your question, I can only suggest you look into Nasa's THEMIS results and the related satellite programs which you can read about here and the radiation belt storm probes and the WIND spacecraft. Perhaps you'll find what you're looking for in their research results.

EDIT: The question is still a bit vague, but since you're interested in satellites I think the area you need to look into is radiation hardening. Orbit does play a role, but designs are specified mostly based on expected lifetime exposure to hard radiation, because there's no real rule of what particle energy sits in what orbit (primarily protons and electrons at various energy levels). It is much more dynamic than that and depends heavily on what the sun is up to.

A reference for you that might help is: A. Holmes- Siedle, and L. Adams, “ Handbook of Radiation Effects,” Oxford University Press, 1993. Where you'll see some of expected exposures and testing requirements for hardware:

rad

Another area for you to look into is radiation hardening and test assurance for spacecrafts. This covers the tests, radiation database data, models, methods, etc. It should be enough to point you in the direction you need.

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  • $\begingroup$ As far as I know "The concentrations and types of particles in the natural space environment vary significantly with altitude, angle of inclination, recent solar activity, and amount of spacecraft shielding." I want to know what we should predict for a satellite in each orbit,but fist of all I should know the space environment and the range of energy for each particle. $\endgroup$
    – Abolfazl
    Aug 31, 2013 at 19:09

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