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How do permanent magnets work on the atomic level? Is there current inside this type magnet?

How do electromagnets work on the atomic level? Is there a current inside this type magnet?

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Permanent magnets are one more demonstration of macroscopic quantum mechanical effects.

Atoms and molecules have been lined up at the original creation of the material of the permanent magnet with spin orientations pointing in one direction. These are small magnetic dipoles and thus a coherent magnetic field is built up in the material.

It is a quantum mechanical effect because even though the field they produce is the same as the field produced by currents going through coils, there is no current in the classical sense. No dissipation, no heat, no resistance to a putative current. This is because quantum mechanics, the underlying framework of all matter, allows for electrons to stay in orbitals around atoms without losing energy, in stable quantum mechanical energy levels. These energy levels are characterized by their quantum numbers, as spin and angular momentum, and these are that have the small magnetic dipole values which build up to the permanent field.

Magnetizable material can be magnetized by being subjected to strong external magnetic fields by changing energy levels microscopically and getting their spins/angular momenta oriented in one direction.

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I assume you mean a permanent magnet. Yes, there is current inside a permanent magnet. What makes the magnetism is that the spins of lots of electrons are lined up to favor a particular direction in the aggregate. The more they line up, the stronger the "static" magnetic field. When the spin vectors are all random, there is not net circular current, and no static magnetic field produced by the bulk material.

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