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This question already has an answer here:

If a compressed spring is dissolved in acid what happens to the elastic potential energy of the spring?

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marked as duplicate by John Rennie, Emilio Pisanty, user10851, akhmeteli, Qmechanic Aug 30 '13 at 19:13

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    $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of Compressed Spring Dissolving in Acid $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Aug 30 '13 at 15:00
  • $\begingroup$ See my answer to the duplicate question. The work put into compressing the spring ends up as thermal energy of the solution i.e. the solution is slightly hotter than it would be if the spring was uncompressed. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Aug 30 '13 at 15:02
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Simply put the enthalpy of formation of a compressed spring is slightly higher than that of an uncompressed spring. That energy will mostly likely be released as heat, kinetic energy of the fluid, and kinetic energy of the spring if it is still experiancing internal stress when it losses structural integrity. It may have some effects on the rate of reaction as the strain on a material can effect the diffusion of ions through it.

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I am not an expert but as much i know it will depend on how the spring is dissolving. Like if the spring dissolve nonuniform then the elastic potential energy will be used in breaking the spring from the point were it got dissolved most and gone weak. And if the spring is dissolving uniformly which is pretty hard to do then it will become weak equally from all the places and i think that the potential energy will cause the spring to fell apart like it is made up of sand. I dont know i right or not but i think this should happen

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