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If we have a planet made out of water, would it be all solid? What about the nucleus? Would it depend on the size of the planet?

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  • $\begingroup$ This is very dependent on the details, like how much mass, temperature (not just dependent on distance from a star, internal heating). A rocky core is more likely as a purely water planet seems unlikely to form. $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 13:54
  • $\begingroup$ Related: a density versus pressure inversion in the "hot ice" phases would probably drive solid- phase convection and transport any high- density metals into the core. $\endgroup$
    – rob
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 16:19
  • $\begingroup$ Also related: the blueberry Earth paper by our own Anders Sandberg, who wrote a serious answer to a silly question here, and posted his analysis to arXiv because the question was closed. I learned about this paper driving down the road listening to "RadioLab" on NPR, who interviewed Sandberg and thought we were party poopers for closing the question. $\endgroup$
    – rob
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 16:30
  • $\begingroup$ We should have migrated the question to XKCD. $\endgroup$
    – mmesser314
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 17:12
  • $\begingroup$ Uranus and Neptune are examples of this kind of planet. $\endgroup$
    – mmesser314
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 17:21

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Is there a planetary geologist on the flight? Maybe one would know better. Here's the thought process: Lots of pressure, maybe some form of ice (like ice-VII), oh wait...it's going to be hot, way past the triple point. I'm going super critical fluid.

Then I google the image: you decide. If it's Earth sized, go with 5000K, if it's Jupiter size, maybe 30000K - 50000K?...just because that's what I remember about aforementioned planets. The pressure sounds like a basic integral.

enter image description here

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