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Not much more to add. By shrink, I mean become more dense at the same pressure and temperature.

And I don't mean vol(A+B) < vol(A) + vol(B). I'm sure this is possible.

Is it possible to get vol(A+B) < vol(A)?

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  • $\begingroup$ I deleted an inappropriate comment and the following discussion. $\endgroup$
    – David Z
    Nov 16, 2013 at 6:28

2 Answers 2

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Yes

http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/practical-physics/volume-change-dissolving-salt-water

This definitely is not material science but chemistry.

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The answer is yes. Adding a salt to water in reasonably small amounts often results in a volume shrinkage such that vol(water+salt) < vol(water). A typical example is sodium chloride.

This works because in the liquid state water has an open structure. The presence of a solute can cause this open structure to break down and the solution to become more dense.

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