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Considering that on the atomic level objects consists of densely spaced positively and negatively charged particles, does not the acceleration of those objects lead to Bremsstrahlung of those particles? And although the monopole field is zero, couldn't higher order multipole radiation escape and cause the inertia? I would think at least a small effect like this must happen, even if it doesn't explain all of the inertia.

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    $\begingroup$ What about neutral particles? They still have inertia while they do not radiate Bremsstrahlung. $\endgroup$ – fffred Aug 9 '13 at 23:09
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    $\begingroup$ They're made up of charged quarks ;-) $\endgroup$ – yippy_yay Aug 9 '13 at 23:15
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    $\begingroup$ What about the neutrino? $\endgroup$ – fffred Aug 9 '13 at 23:23
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    $\begingroup$ Neutrinos do have inertia. Once set off in some direction, a beam of neutrinos keeps heading that way. Direction is set, even if you can't F=ma them into speeding up or slowing down. $\endgroup$ – DarenW Aug 10 '13 at 0:12
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    $\begingroup$ No, bremsstrahlung isn't a good explanation, but along such lines of thought, inertia coming from quantum interactions, the writings of Bernard Haisch might be of interest. $\endgroup$ – DarenW Aug 10 '13 at 0:16
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No, Bremsstrahlung does not cause inertia.

The power radiated by Bremsstrahlung scales as charge but not mass. Also, it scales as acceleration squared.

This does not reduce to the classical inertia $m\vec a$.

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  • $\begingroup$ I mentioned in my question that Bremsstrahlung might not be able to explain all of the effect. Additionally, mass and (internal) charge are proportional to each other: For each additional neutral particle we get additional internal charge-constituents. So inertia would be proportional to mass if due to Bremsstrahlung. $\endgroup$ – yippy_yay Aug 12 '13 at 22:10

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