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I understand how in the original double slit experiment light goes through two slits and you get an interference pattern because of constructive and destructive interference.

But when you put an electron beam through the two slits, I read that you get an interference pattern because of the probability of detection.

So do the electrons construct each other and destroy each other or do they simply not hit one part of the screen or the other due to probability?

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The interference effect has nothing to do with electrons interacting with antimatter or with each other, which can be demonstrated by sending electrons through one at a time so there are no other particles present for the electrons to interact with.

The wavefunction which describes an incoming electrons exhibits the same interference pattern which appears when you send light through, and the dark spots are where the probability of an electron striking the film goes to zero.

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  • $\begingroup$ Do the electrons do destructive interference or simply scatter? $\endgroup$
    – icy cave
    Nov 14, 2022 at 16:31
  • $\begingroup$ @icycave The wavefunction exhibits destructive interference at the dark spots, and as a result no electrons strike the screen in those locations. They aren't scattering off of other electrons in the beam, if that's what you're asking. $\endgroup$
    – J. Murray
    Nov 14, 2022 at 16:33
  • $\begingroup$ So you can destroy electrons? $\endgroup$
    – icy cave
    Nov 14, 2022 at 16:33
  • $\begingroup$ @icycave That's not what I said. The dark spots appear in the locations where the probability of an electron striking the screen goes to zero. That doesn't mean any electrons are being destroyed - simply that they are striking the screen somewhere else. $\endgroup$
    – J. Murray
    Nov 14, 2022 at 16:35
  • $\begingroup$ Okay, thank you that's the only answer I needed. $\endgroup$
    – icy cave
    Nov 14, 2022 at 16:36
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Interference with light is understandable because light act as a wave and wave is disturbance or oscillation of medium propagating in space. As they can be represented by vector having phase, they add constructively and destructively. Their dark and bright fringes are result of probability of many particles moving together (disturbing nearby), that is why two wave superimpose at same space because they behave as effect.

This can may be happen to very small particles. The appearnce of quality of fringes depends upon more number of particles at a time. We know that probability gives better result on number of trials or participants. This is evident in interference of electrons, as intensity was low so a bad interference pattern appear. As time pass, number of electrons increases and fringes seen distinctlively.

One thing more, as interference depends upon slit equivalent to wavelength in perpendicular direction, it means that they are not just oscillating in that direction. But their motion, whether photon or electron moves in helical path and their wavelength is size of circle they form. And electric and magnetic field are perpendicular at a point and also perpendicular to motion. But overall magnetic field is in direction of direction of propagation, like tangent, normal and torsional vector behave.

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