0
$\begingroup$

This question already has an answer here:

My question is related to the first page of this article regarding the big bang theory and refers to this specific sentence:

Armed with the best physics of the 20th century, Albert Einstein came to very similar conclusions with his theory of relativity. Just consider the effect of mass on time. A planet's hefty mass warps time -- making time run a tiny bit slower for a human on Earth's surface than a satellite in orbit. The difference is too small to notice, but time even runs more slowly for someone standing next to a large boulder than it does for a person standing alone in a field. The pre-big bang singularity possessed all the mass in the universe, effectively bringing time to a standstill.

Considering that, here is my question: Does time actually run slower for a human standing next to a boulder? How does that work and how/where can I find out more?

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by BebopButUnsteady, John Rennie, Dilaton, Qmechanic Aug 6 '13 at 14:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1
$\begingroup$

It does indeed. According to general relativity, time is affected by gravity; even the very small amount of gravity that is produced by a boulder has some effect on the passage of time. I will note that just being on Earth is going to have much more of an effect on the passage of time than whether or not a boulder is present. Even so, the change by the Earth's gravity is negligible.

I don't really know of anything to read on specifically something like this without just going into relativity, but there is this Wikipedia article that goes over it which isn't very long.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.