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Ok, I always notice this weird thing and try to overcome it but cant.
Ok as shown in the image when I ride the bike by just one hand and pull the handle back say from the right side so as commonly the handle should rotate towards right and the bike should turn to right but it never happen no matter what i do the handle turns to left and the bike always go to left and when i try to push it forward so that it turns to left then the handle turns to right and so the bike also turns to right. As from how much i know about laws of motion's i don't know why it happens. Please help as it is too much weird and interesting for me enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Do you control the bike, or is the bike controlling you? What do you mean when you pull the handle on the right it rotates to the left? Are you leaning to the left when you do this? $\endgroup$ – ja72 Jul 29 '13 at 16:35
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Pulling the right handlebar towards you causes the front wheel to turn to the right, which causes the entire bicycle to bank to the left, because the support points are moved to the right. Then, unless you simply let the bike fall over to the left, you unconsciously balance the bike by turning into the bank.

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  • $\begingroup$ Even if that reaction happens unconsiously, you would still realise that your hand applied a force. I don't think that is what the OP is experiencing. All in all, the question is not too clear to say anything definitley $\endgroup$ – udiboy1209 Jul 29 '13 at 15:56
  • $\begingroup$ yes i pull the handle towards me but it feels like that i have pushed it away from even if dont. I have edited the question maybe it wiil be more clear $\endgroup$ – Deiknymi Jul 29 '13 at 16:01
  • $\begingroup$ @Akash: There's the conscious part and the unconscious part. Unconsciously, you always turn into the bank. (That's how you ride a bike.) Consciously you momentarily pulled the handlebar toward you, but then your cerebellum took over with the unconscious part. If it didn't, you'd fall over. $\endgroup$ – Mike Dunlavey Jul 29 '13 at 16:08
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    $\begingroup$ @Akash: just for fun once, I tried crossing my hands on the handlebar. I crashed immediately. Not fun! That just showed me how the automatic response had been working, and how easy it was to mess it up :) $\endgroup$ – Mike Dunlavey Jul 29 '13 at 16:25
  • $\begingroup$ hahah you have a point now i get the situation however thank's $\endgroup$ – Deiknymi Jul 29 '13 at 16:27
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Pulling the right handlebar rotates the front wheel clockwise. This causes the bottom of the bike to move to the right. If you haven't leaned to the right as part of this maneuver then you are now out of balance and leaning to the left (your body hasn't moved, but since the bottom of the bike moved right you are now leaning left). If you don't correct (by turning left or leaning right) then you'll fall over to the left due to balance, not anything to do with the forward/inward/outward forces on the bike.

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The above explanations are incorrect. What you are describing is countersteering. You have learned to do this subconsciously and is how a 2 wheeled vehicle initiates a turn. Above a certain speed the centripetal and wheel gyroscopic forces are large enough to impact on the mass of bike and rider to have an effect. The main force is a centripetal (cp) one acting towards the center of the curve you describe. So, I consciously want to go left...pulling the right bar turns the wheel right, which creates a cp force that tips you over about the contact patches (the preverbial centrifugal force....actually the machine is always trying to go off at a tangent to the curve). In addition, there is a gyroscopic, less effective but additive moment that acts on the steering axis tipping you inwards..to the left in your example, as you pulled on the right bar...This depends on the rate of pull ie how much momentum you apply to the wheel when steering.

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