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I'm comparing different coating agents for ammonium sulfate fertilizer granules, coating agent is an additive to limit the dust emission, so I have a new coating agent that is lower cost and more effective, but the problem is I need to prove experimentally that the new one is more effective than the one we use. so is there any way ( experimental technique ) to estimate the amount of dust to prove that the new agent is effective?

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    Jun 22 at 13:16

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A very simple method for measuring dust in the air is to draw the air through a filter using a pump and then weigh the filter.

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If enough dust is suspended in air then it could impact the optical properties of the air, so you can simply measure changes in the apparent brightness of a light source, picked up on the other end of a controlled environment.

Alternatively, just consider weighing samples (of controlled total mass) before and after some controlled time of exposure to a controlled environment. With precise enough measuring equipment, a loss of mass via dust emission could be detectable.

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