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From what I’ve read protons and electrons only are attracted to each other because they have opposite electric charges. What I don’t understand, though is that I’ve also read that both protons and electrons have a magnetic north and South Pole. If protons and electrons have a north and South Pole, then shouldn’t they repel each other when like poles are pointed at each other? Or, at least be less attracted to each other?

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Or, at least be less attracted to each other?

Yes, this exactly. But it's a very, very small effect compared to the electric force attracting them. This slight repulsion is one of the contributors to the so-called hyperfine structure, where a tiny energy difference is seen between atomic states depending on the spin and orbital angular momentum of the electrons relative to the nucleus.

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If protons and electrons have a north and South Pole, then shouldn’t they repel each other when like poles are pointed at each other? Or, at least be less attracted to each other?

Yes, this energy difference is the source of the hyperfine structure. This is useful, for example, in atomic clocks.

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Compare the Lyman Series, with minimum wavelength $122{\rm nm}$ which is a Coulomb transition, to the famous $21{\rm cm}$ line, which is the atomic hydrogen electron-proton spin-flip transition: it's a factor of 1.7 million in energy.

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