0
$\begingroup$

If saltwater corrodes metal. Can we effectively stop this by passing some electric current?

Has this been tried before?

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ By what mechanism do you think a current would help or hinder corrosion? $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    May 24 at 20:04
  • $\begingroup$ Electricity. I do not know I just got the idea from somewhere that salt has some kind of electronic bond so if we applied electricity to a piece of metal then the electronic bond of the salt will be repelled. $\endgroup$ May 25 at 21:12

1 Answer 1

2
$\begingroup$

Yes. Pumping current into the hull of a ship in moored storage has been used for decades to prevent the hull from corroding in constant contact with sea water. To accomplish this, a very large carbon electrode is put into the water next to the ship's hull and the electrode and the ship are then connected to a very large low-voltage power supply which pushes electrons into the hull metal and pulls them out of the electrode. This "countercurrent" cancels the natural tendency of the hull metal (steel) to experience direct chemical attack by the salt water and get converted into rust.

This same technique is also used to halt corrosion of steel rebar inside concrete structures like bridge abutments and the like.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.