-2
$\begingroup$

Do fluids flow from high pressure areas to low ones? Why ?

$\endgroup$
1
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Hello oussema.omar and welcome to Physics SE. Your question is a quite well known whose answer can be found in many elementary physics textbooks. Have you tried doing some search on the web or in any books? Is there something specific that troubles you? Have you tried anything to approach the problem? $\endgroup$
    – ZaellixA
    May 22 at 13:11

2 Answers 2

1
$\begingroup$

Generally, yes, although some peculiar cases may exist. Hydrodynamics ($\approx$ fluid dynamics) is the field of physics/engineering devoted to describing such processes. In particular, Navier-Stokes equation explicitly gives the acceleration of a liquid as opposite to the pressure gradient: $$ \rho\frac{D\mathbf{u}}{dt}=-\nabla p+\mathbf{g} $$ (For simplicity I omitted viscous terms, in which case it is more appropriately called Euler equation.)

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Because high pressure areas exert more force on particles of fluid than low pressure areas, particles move in the direction of the net force, i.e., from high to low pressure areas, until the pressures equalize.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.