0
$\begingroup$

In a normal system of parallel springs, systems of springs

We say that their extension of the each spring is same, so the equivalent spring constant k is the sum of all k of spring. But how can this make sense if one spring in a system of two springs, has a very large k1, and one has a very small k2? Wouldn't the system, like a load,when force is applied, "turns over" and "slanted" ?

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ If the spring konstant $ k_1 >k_2$ and the springs extension is the same , the spring force one will be greater then spring force two .$f_i=k_i s$ where s is the spring extension $\endgroup$
    – Eli
    Commented May 12, 2022 at 14:41

1 Answer 1

0
$\begingroup$

Yes; a resultant torque causes rotation. If you don’t see this addressed in a problem, it’s because the block is being assumed to translate only, not rotate (e.g., perhaps it’s riding on frictionless tracks).

Other likely assumptions for this problem are that the wall and block are rigid, the springs are ideal, the system doesn’t sag from gravity, and that no out-of-plane motion occurs, for instance. Sometimes the problem will state these assumptions, and sometimes you have to deduce and apply them through experience.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.