0
$\begingroup$

How is the plasma heated in ICF? I know in MCF in the ITER tokamak uses external methods such as NBI but how in inertial confinement fusion is the plasma heated to the temperatures which allows fusions to occur?

Thanks

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ At the Z machine (sandia.gov/z-machine/fusion) a z-pinch rapidly compresses the fuel. Laser pre-heat can be used as well. At NIF, it is all lasers driving the hohlraum to compress and heat the fuel. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    May 11, 2022 at 14:09

2 Answers 2

0
$\begingroup$

Inertial fusion consists of supplying, via laser beams, a sufficient quantity of energy to a very small quantity of deuterium and tritium contained in a capsule a few millimeters in diameter. This capsule, or target, will be very strongly compressed to both heat it and bring it to a very high density. There are two schemes for inertial fusion. The so-called direct attack scheme consists of directly impacting this capsule composed of hydrogen isotopes with laser beams. The other scheme consists of putting the capsule in a metal cylinder, centimeter in length. This cylinder has two entry holes for the laser beams. These impact the internal surfaces of the cylinder, heat the metal which emits X-rays. These X-rays will compress the capsule, producing a fusion reaction.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

How is the plasma heated in ICF?

Adiabatic compression. My air pump gets hot when I pump air into my bike tire, imagine what it's like to compress a light gas to the point where it's 100 times as dense as lead?!

Some of the energy of the laser gets in there too, especially electrons that are directly accelerated inward. This actually turns out to be a bad thing, because it pre-heats the interior and thus resists the infalling ions. This is why they moved to higher frequencies, blue into the UV, as this spends more of its energy on the ions rather than the electrons.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.