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Since a bridge rectifier converts ac to dc. Will this charge my capacitor to max capacity how hooking it up to a battery would? The positive is charging the anode, while the cathode is grounded. Any reason why this circuit would not work? When just trying to convert ac to do soley for the purpose of successfuly charging a capacitor.

Rectifier circuit

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, but this isn't a bridge rectifier. $\endgroup$
    – user253751
    May 9 at 12:14
  • $\begingroup$ If you are doing electricity experiments in your lab, you should really invest in a good lab power supply costing a couple hundred dollars at most. It will have adjustable voltage and current, built-in measurement of both, short circuit protection, galvanic isolation (like a transformer), and no possibility of touching dangerous voltages (they often go up to a maximum of 30V). $\endgroup$
    – user253751
    May 9 at 12:15
  • $\begingroup$ @J... I think it's clear the intention is to plug in the left side into a power supply (probably a wall outlet). Plugs are often drawn this way since the power supply isn't actually part of the circuit in question. Although usually the connections are labeled L/N $\endgroup$
    – user253751
    May 9 at 12:20
  • $\begingroup$ Once you've drawn the full wave rectifier correctly with the grounded centre tap on the transformer that looks like it's been deleted from the schematic, you'll find it's a low impedance voltage source, unsuited to capacitor charging, which is better done with a high impedance current source. Use a series impedance like a resistor, or a flyback converter which is inherently current output. $\endgroup$
    – Neil_UK
    May 9 at 18:38

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The circuit you've shown does not work as you can see in this simulation:

https://tinyurl.com/y3dkokdy

Probably you are referring to the single-way full-wave rectifier circuit or else known centre-tapped rectifier and not the more familiar double-way full-wave or else known bridge rectifier in which however the use of center-tapped transformer in the secondary winding is mandatory. The center tap connection in this case acts like the neutral thus the ground:

single-way full-wave rectifier

Here is a simulation of this circuit with the filter capacitor and a $1KΩ$ load:

https://tinyurl.com/y6zkwoyp

The transformer winding ratio is 1:1.

The $1:1$ windings ratio in transformers called also isolation transformers installed before the main appliance control fuse panel connection is usually used for isolating the mains appliance from the ground so that a user accidentally touching a hot wire does not get electrocuted via the ground and without blowing any fuses at the mains control panel since there is no ground (Earth) connection back to the mains supply (CAUTION! does not offer protection when touching both hot and neutral wires in any installation or simultaneously different live hot wires L1 L2 L3 in a 3-phase installation).

centre-tapped rectifier with filter and load simulation

Note: Green waveform indicates voltage and yellow waveform current.

CAUTION DANGER!!: THE CENTRE-TAPPED TRANSFORMER SHOWN ABOVE IN A $1:1$ CONFIGURATION CANNOT IN ANY CIRCUMSTANCES USED AS AN ISOLATION TRANSFORMER. DANGER OF ELECTROCUTION. ESPECIALLY FOR COUNTRIES WHICH ARE USING 240V MAINS ELECTRICITY. SEE BELOW FIGURE (STILL $120V$ ARE PRESENT!).

DANGER!

Please read here:https://www.soundonsound.com/sound-advice/crosstalk-readers-writes

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  • $\begingroup$ I've updated first simulation link. Simulation shows that the circuit is not working. Capacitor is not charging. Transformer ratio is set at 1:1. $\endgroup$
    – Markoul11
    May 9 at 7:11
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    $\begingroup$ Please, don't play with high power electricity. This can be very hazardous! $\endgroup$
    – Markoul11
    May 9 at 7:16
  • $\begingroup$ If it was a transformer without a center tap. How could I charge the capacitor with two diodes? I want full wave rectification without a center tap and only two diodes. $\endgroup$
    – TechMelts
    May 9 at 7:40
  • $\begingroup$ Answer was updated once more. $\endgroup$
    – Markoul11
    May 9 at 9:17
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    $\begingroup$ @TechMelts Better play safe with lower input voltages. You can use a full wave voltage multiplier, see here: electronics-tutorials.ws/blog/voltage-multiplier-circuit.html and this tutorial video here, youtube.com/watch?v=iDQRB8DOJE4 . $\endgroup$
    – Markoul11
    May 9 at 9:42
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Would this circuit charge the capacitor with the cathode to the ground outside?

No, there's no complete circuit by which current flows from the transformer secondary to the capacitor and back to the other terminal of the transformer secondary.

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    $\begingroup$ @TechMelts Please, don't play with high power electricity. This can be very hazardous. $\endgroup$
    – Markoul11
    May 9 at 6:58

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