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We know a thread or string experiences the same tension force throughout the whole length,but when we tie a knot in the thread,why does the tension force become different in the two sides of the knot? Is it possible to explain it through newtonian mechanics?

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you show an example? Why do you think the tension would be different? $\endgroup$
    – BowlOfRed
    Apr 25 at 8:50

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Unless that knot is tying the string to some stationary object (in which case it's more properly called a "hitch" rather than a "knot"), the tension force is necessarily the same on both sides. Otherwise, there'd be a net force one way or the other, and the knot would accelerate in that direction. (Moreover, if just tying a knot in a string resulted in any such net force, you could trivially construct a perpetual motion machine, thereby solving the energy crisis, remediating climate change, etc, etc.)

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