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In the original Hawking's paper "Particle creation by black holes" he first studies the collapsing star spacetime, and then the quasi-stationary phase of the black hole.

In the collapsing star spacetime, how can we understand where the radiation comes from? Since in the quasi-stationary phase, we can imagine the creation of particle/antiparticle and then the emission of the one which has positive energy.

I have some problems to have a clear story of what is happening from the beginning to the end.

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    $\begingroup$ "Since in the quasi-stationary phase, we can imagine the creation of particle/antiparticle and then the emission of the one which has positive energy." By this you mean you are interpreting the radiation as being due to particle-antiparticle pairs being created near the event horizon? $\endgroup$ Apr 16, 2022 at 21:35
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    $\begingroup$ I guess that can be an interpretation of the undeterminacy in the energy density near the horizon $\endgroup$ Apr 16, 2022 at 21:37
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    $\begingroup$ Also, what do you mean precisely by quasi-stationary? It could be my memory failing me, but I think the collapsing star spacetime is the only spacetime considered in Hawking's paper (i.e., he doesn't consider an eternal Schwarzschild solution) $\endgroup$ Apr 16, 2022 at 21:37
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    $\begingroup$ In the last part, "Back-reaction of the metric". All the radiation cannot take place only in the collapsing phase. So once the black hole is formed you still have an emission of particles. And quasi-stationary, because your black hole is decreasing in the area and so it never reaches the ideal stationary symmetry that we usually assume when we study Schwarzschild spactime. $\endgroup$ Apr 16, 2022 at 21:46
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    $\begingroup$ Well, this last part confused me a bit :( $\endgroup$ Apr 16, 2022 at 21:48

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