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Can anyone recommend a resource on black hole thermodynamics for physicists who are not familiar with this area? I'd like to see a rough sketch of the derivations of black hole entropy and Hawking radiation, for example. Something at the level of a review article or informal collection of notes aimed at physicists or grad students would be ideal.

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    $\begingroup$ Expositions on Hawking radiation in particular can be found in Wald or even Carroll $\endgroup$ Apr 14, 2022 at 16:38
  • $\begingroup$ Like Nihar said, QFT in curved spacetime is what you need for the derivation of Hawking radiation. Carroll covers it pretty nicely. More broadly, if you're interested in the quantum aspects of thermodynamics of blackholes, I personally like these notes by Atish Dabholkar a lot: arxiv.org/abs/1208.4814. $\endgroup$
    – user87745
    Apr 14, 2022 at 17:31

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Ted Jacobson's "Introductory Lectures on Black Hole Thermodynamics" (1996) give a rather didactic introduction into the topic, discussing the physics with as little advanced mathematics as possible. It is very useful, in my opinion, for getting a feeling of the the main ideas, and seeing a bigger picture behind them.

A more recent review by Aron Wall provides succinct bits of more up-to-date "memes" of the field. It is not designed to be a thorough course, but can serve as a nice gateway to current research literature.

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Bob Wald's Living Review, The Thermodynamics of Black Holes, is 20 years old, so it is missing the most recent developments. It touches on the big topics of classical BH thermodynamics, Hawking radiation, and BH entropy, and it is well referenced.

It is a relatively high level summary, outlining arguments without presenting detailed calculations. It does assume the reader has familiarity with the technical vocabulary of general relativity. For more technical detail the reader can follow the references.

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