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Im trying to build a custom Geiger-Muller counter with an argon tube ( i’m still choosing to use wether argon 36 or 40 ) . The fact is that the counter will be made of multiple tubes which are all on the path of the radiations . So my question is : Can a single or a couple of gamma rays travel through multiple tubes of this kind ? How much energy will they approximately lose by doing so ?

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  • $\begingroup$ gamma rays are charge-neutral. $\endgroup$
    – franz
    Apr 4 at 7:49
  • $\begingroup$ sorry i meant energy $\endgroup$ Apr 4 at 7:50

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This will depend on the energy of the gamma, the size of your tubes, and the density with which you fill them. For typical values the answer is yes. Get the basics e.g. from this old but valid pdf or your favorite book on the subject matter. You can find absorption coefficients e.g. from NIST. And please don't get a heart attack when you compare the prize of isotopic argon to natural argon :) I bet there is no reason for you to go with the expensive solution.

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In the mid-1960s, the US and Soviet nuclear arsenals were being populated with increasing numbers of hydrogen bombs. In the US, this meant that the civil defense units had to switch from Geiger counters (that look for alpha and beta particles) to ionization chambers that could be designed to be particularly sensitive to high-energy photons instead.

The second-generation radiation detectors had high-voltage (~300 volt) sensor chambers filled with air at atmospheric pressure and were made out of aluminum, which excluded charged particles but readily admitted gamma rays.

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