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Would the kinetic energy of electron be same as that of the individual ideal gas particle (in which it exists) at a non zero temperature?

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The electron is an elementary particle and can be modeled correctly only with quantum mechanics. Your question is a classical physics question and can only be answered within the semi classical theory of the Bohr model where the electron is modeled as going around the nucleus in a classical orbit.

What is kinetic energy?

$E_k=1/2Mv^2$

where $M$ is the mass of the composite particle and $v$ the velocity . Classically all the particles composing the mass if suddenly released from their binding would take away the kinetic energy that belongs to their individual masses, as energy is a conserved quantity, and classically mass is also a conserved quantity.

As the electron mass is very much smaller than the nucleus mass, no it would not have the same kinetic energy as the individual gas particle.

It would have the same velocity but the fraction of kinetic energy according to its mass.

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