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Recently an article came out about the maximum number of planets in an artificial Solar System. See below the image for the full article link . It suggests that if each planet is placed at a distance outside of each others sphere of influence then a large number of planets can be placed in the same orbit, then to cram as many planets as possible at different orbital distances, every other orbit is made to orbit in the opposite direction (in retrograde) so that passing planets gravitationally interact as little as possible.

enter image description here enter image description here https://www.livescience.com/maximum-number-of-planets-orbit-sun

Although this is theoretical and would need to be engineered is it possible to scale up the system to a system of stars orbiting a Supermassive Blackhole?

If the stars are placed at distances from each other further than their sphere of influence, could a sufficiently massive blackhole be at the centre of the system, if the stars are out at a distance to avoid eccentric orbits? Would the black hole have enough gravitational influence to keep stars in place at further out orbits and would the stars remain stable like the planets would theoretically be in the article?

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What the article describes is essentially a series of concentric Klemperer rosettes. Such arrangements are known to be gravitationally unstable.

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