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Is it possible to unify the strong, weak, electric and magnetic field just by Maxwellian type equations? (Maxwell by adding a small change - unified electric and magnetic field, then Einstein's equations - use it to create special and general theory of relativity, now maybe all we need is a little more change to unify all fields,) When $B$ and $E$ are known magnetic and electric fields, then $W$ and $S$ are weak and strong fields, what are their units?

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    $\begingroup$ I dont understand your question, Perhaps you are referring to the standard model. $\endgroup$ – Prathyush Jun 18 '13 at 23:28
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    $\begingroup$ You've got some catching up to do! Look up "Yang-Mills Theory". From Wiki: Yang–Mills theory seeks to describe the behavior of elementary particles using these non-Abelian Lie groups and is at the core of the unification of the Weak and Electromagnetic force (i.e. U(1) × SU(2)) as well as Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of the Strong force (based on SU(3)). Thus it forms the basis of our current understanding of particle physics, the Standard Model. $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Jun 19 '13 at 0:29
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    $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "strong field" and "weak field" ...? This question looks very confused to me. $\endgroup$ – Dilaton Jun 19 '13 at 2:08
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    $\begingroup$ What Alfred Centauri said. The weak and strong theories are generalisations of ordinary electromagnetism. So for the strong force their are chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic fields (actually eight of each) and for the weak force there are weak-electric and weak-magnetic fields (actually three of each). These follow a close analogy to ordinary E&M (although the theories are much more complicated). It is less common to work with the electric & magnetic fields than the vector potentials for technical reasons, but they exist. $\endgroup$ – Michael Brown Jun 19 '13 at 2:18
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I'm guessing at what you're asking - ignore this answer if I've misunderstood you.

Maxwell's equations describe the classical behaviour of electromagnetism. They can only do this because the EM forces are long range so at macroscopic distances they behave classically. By contrast, the weak and strong forces are short range and cease to act over anything like the classical limit of distance. There is no classical approximation to describe the weak and strong forces, so there is no analogy to Maxwell's equation.

Above the electroweak transition the electroweak force will become long range. Whether there is some classical limit in the spirit of the Maxwell's equations is a good question and I don't know the answer. I would guess that there is no such limit for the strong force even about the EW transition because the force will still be confined.

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    $\begingroup$ At high enough temperature and energy density, the strong force stops confining. This plays a role in the standard stories of the early universe. $\endgroup$ – user1504 Jun 19 '13 at 12:45
  • $\begingroup$ Ah yes, as in the quark gluon plasma. I bet there's still no (useful) classic long distance description though. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jun 19 '13 at 13:45

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