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mass is energy per c square $m=E/c^2$ energy is made up of photons but what made up photon itself? what made up a single photon?


Replay to comment: but as we can see in history early phyisicists though that atom in non-fissionable (thats why they called it atom), now we call photon elementary but it may be a composite particle!, why not?

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  • $\begingroup$ A photon is one of the elementary particles we have found out in nature. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elementary_particle Nothing makes up a photon, that is what elementary means. Ensembles (i.e. very large numbers) of photons make up light as we see it. Photons have energy= h*nu (nu is the frequency) . Energy is a much larger concept than photons. $\endgroup$ – anna v Jun 15 '13 at 10:51
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    $\begingroup$ Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/13851 $\endgroup$ – Slaviks Jun 15 '13 at 11:16
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    $\begingroup$ In ancient times were hand waving and philosophy physics. Physics since Newton advances with mathematical models that fit existing data and predict future behaviors. At the moment the photon is an elementary particle. There exist compositeness theories but at the moment are marginalized because they cannot really fit the data summarized in the standard model of physics which has been verified over and over.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Model . This is a big load to carry for any competing theory of compositeness and nobody has succeeded up to now. $\endgroup$ – anna v Jun 15 '13 at 12:55
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Photons are elementary particles, so they aren't made of anything. What does this mean? This means that a photon is an entity with the right mass, spin, electric charge and so on

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everything depends on how you observe it or may be how you want to observe it.

$c$ is a constant and not light, if you target the photons you do need to pass to Planck's formulation $\hbar\dots$.

But to your question: it depends how how you observe them!

Photons can be observed as superpositioned waves. Photons can be also observed as particle. Photons are the elementary superpositioned waves or particles of light - or better say they are themselves light! Photons are indeed elementary superpositioned waves or particles that package energy.

The formula above says that photons would have also a mass equivalent. However it does not say how and under which condition you may convert photons in your lab to mass particles.

But what makes up a single photon? My favorite answer would be: the probability of meeting it at a location or with a certain energy.

Hope this helps.

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Pair Production confirms that radiation (photon) has corpuscular properties. a highly energetic photon, interacting with a nucleus, disappears and produces an electron and a positron.

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