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If the sedimentation rate can be determined for a coarse chemical suspension or a suspension containing large particles (i.e., particles with radii between $100$ to $200 \mu m$) in a medium like vegetable oil, Can they also be determined if a centrifuge was used to speed up the separation process, if so would it be equivalent to what is obtained under the force of gravity itself? Any help with this question would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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There a commonly-used way to calculate how to scale up or down an experiment, and predict the results correctly, as follows:

There are groupings of numbers including things like like viscosity, surface tension, gravity, length, time, etc. which when multiplied together have no units. Different groupings yield different nondimensional parameters which can then be used to scale something up or down and leave the fundamental dynamics unchanged.

these scaling parameters are named after their discoverers: Reynolds number, Mach number, Nusselt number, Froude number, etc. I'm guessing you want a number like this which contains gravity, viscosity, buoyant force, length, and time. Wikipedia or the engineering stack exchange will tell you which one to pick, and how to use it.

A little-known fact is that there is another similitude parameter called the Number number, which tells you how many nondimensional groups you need to solve a given problem. Its use is taught in only the very most advanced engineering physics courses in the world.

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