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It's known$^1$ that the phase factor in quantum mechanics can be divided into geometric phase and dynamical phase. Since in quantum optics, light is treated as a quantum object, i.e., the photon. So the phase in quantum optics might also be divided into geometric phase and dynamical phase. To be more concrete, if a photon passes through the phase shifter, obtaining a phase $e^{i\theta}$, what kind of phase it is? The geometrical one or a dynamical one?


  1. David Bar Moshe (https://physics.stackexchange.com/q/369735), What is the difference between dynamical and geometric phases?
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    $\begingroup$ What kind of phase shifter are you referring to? $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 5, 2021 at 0:36
  • $\begingroup$ In principle either, depending on how the phase shifter is made (it doesn't matter how a phase shifter shifts phase, as long as it does it). But I think most of the time you'd call it a dynamical phase. $\endgroup$
    – knzhou
    Commented Dec 5, 2021 at 0:37
  • $\begingroup$ @LucasBaldo What about the usually used phase shifter in the MZ interferometer, Which can be described as $e^{i\hat{n}\theta}$? $\endgroup$
    – Sherlock
    Commented Dec 5, 2021 at 1:38
  • $\begingroup$ @knzhou I can't see why most of the time it's a dynamical phase? Can you explain in more detail? Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – Sherlock
    Commented Dec 5, 2021 at 1:40

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