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Can Brownian motion explain why white smoke (fume) generated by chemical reactions moves around in the air?

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Brownian motion would cause a slow spread. “Moving around” probably indicates convection. Your chemical reaction may be exothermic.

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  • $\begingroup$ I learned that the spread of cigarette smoke is an example of the Brownian movement. Is the spread of smoke in the text different from cigarette smoke? $\endgroup$
    – Yusun Lee
    Nov 21, 2021 at 14:31
  • $\begingroup$ Brownian motion is movement of atoms caused by another invisible atoms in a zig Zag way . So I think yes . However density of fumes also play a role , it is warm and less dense air that rises up .I think convention is also at play . $\endgroup$
    – Sidhi
    Nov 21, 2021 at 15:52

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